Tag Archives: Studio & Gallery

The Artist

Alan Reed

Florence from Piazza Michelangelo

21. My style really began to develop when I was an art student. It improved through my desire to become a better watercolourist. More than ever, I am always seeking to improve my skills and to become the artist I’m meant to be.

22. I find that I’ve learned to know when to stop. Too many watercolours can be ruined by overworking them. I’d rather leave the painting looking slightly unfinished (it never does!) than overdo it.

23. The elements are the biggest problem. Changing weather conditions, especially the arrival of rain when the scene started off bright and sunny is a problem. I actually enjoy painting the rain from start to finish if I’m properly prepared. The painting above of Florence was inspired by a watercolour painted on location in the rain. My wife had to stand in the cold holding an umbrella over me!

24. If a watercolour goes badly wrong at the very start, then I’ll scrap it. If a small mistake occurs, then I can usually correct it by lifting out the offending area and re-painting it.

 

Alan Reed

Sight Size method in Studio

25. There are various techniques one can use to draw out a composition in the studio such as grids, sight-size, tracing etc. I’ve used many of them from time to time. However, I’m finding that over the last few years I’m doing more and more “drawing” with the paint brush. Indeed, with my location painting, I rarely use a pencil and prefer to paint directly onto the watercolour paper. The “Sight Size” method is is more a philosophy of seeing which I use when painting portraits.

26. At art college I had a brilliant lecturer called Laurie Stangroom who used to do artist’s impressions of buildings from architects plans. He taught me how to project the plans into any perspective you wanted through understanding picture planes, eye levels and vanishing points. It’s been a tremendous foundation for my watercolour paintings of cities. I like John Singer Sargent’s belief that painting is a science which is necessary to acquire in order to make of it an art.

27. I always start my watercolour work with large washes of colour to take away the white of the paper and to set the mood for the rest of the painting. It’s only when these washes are dry that I will begin to work on the main elements of the subject. I always work from light to dark in watercolour. If it’s a portrait or figure, I will work on a neutral tinted canvas (a mix of white, raw umber and black) rather than pure white. I like to make sure that the proportions are correct before commencing on any colour work. It’s usually best to get the mid tones in first before doing the darks and highlights.

28. I’m currently working towards my next exhibition at my Studio & Gallery at our home in Ponteland, Northumberland and a number of commissions. My wife and I are always seeking to improve our website www.alanreed.com to make it more interesting and informative, not just for online sales but as a resource for artists. We’ve already made a couple of painting videos and plan to do more in the future. The Artist in me is always wanting to move forward.

www.alanreed.com

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Commission a Portrait

Alan Reed

CastleGate Portraits Painted in oils

On the 9th September 2015 a project was finally unveiled which I had been working on for two years. The artwork depicts a selection of portraits of people who are either past, present or future members of City Church Newcastle which Susan and I have been a part of since 1993. The portraits are hanging in the atrium of the CastleGate building which we bought as a church in the late nineties and is to reflect the vision of the church.

Most of the portraits have been painted from life over several sittings at my Studio & Gallery in Ponteland. Typically, each sitting would last a couple of hours which has been a mutually enjoyable experience for both myself and the sitter.

Part of painting someones portrait is not just capturing a good likeness but also about bringing out something of the persons personality and character. That comes from spending time in conversation with the sitter, getting to know them and bringing out an expression or “look” that is typically them.

I find that over the course of a two hour sitting, the light will often change casting either a shadow over part of the face or a highlight on another part which, when painted, really helps to describe something about that person. This has always been my aim since investing a huge amount of time in studying portraiture over the last four years. It’s not just about developing a good, sound painting technique in oils but producing a piece of art which people can really connect with, whether they know the person or not. I find that when I’m studying John Singer Sargent’s portraits, I’m really captivated, not just by the painting but the subject too. I somehow feel as though I’d like to meet them.

Alan Reed

Atrium of the CastleGate

If you would like to Commission a Portrait then why not visit the CastleGate on Melbourne Street, Newcastle to take a closer look at the 24 portraits which have been painted in oils on aluminium panels.

To find out more about the process of commissioning a portrait you can also visit my website or Studio & Gallery in Ponteland.

 

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30th Anniversary

Alan Reed Art 1984-2014

30th Anniversary

Thank you to all our customers who came along and supported us at our Christmas Party weekend in November. We hope you enjoyed your complimentary goody bag to go with the paintings and Christmas Cards you purchased.

Our 30th Anniversary Christmas Exhibition is currently on view at my Studio & Gallery in Ponteland until 24th December. Our usual opening hours are 9:30-5pm Tuesday to Saturday although we will try to accommodate customers outside of these hours too.

There’s usual ample parking space on our drive and along Elm Road that runs alongside our home and you will be offered fresh coffee or tea on arrival.

The Christmas Exhibition is a mixed show of original paintings, limited edition prints and Christmas cards depicting scenes of the North East, Scotland, Italy and the Middle East.

Over the following 10 months I will be holding a number of other events and exhibitions outside from our Studio and Gallery to celebrate my 30th Anniversary which you can find out about by subscribing to our newsletter.

In January I will be showing my painting “Last Light, Ruwi” at the Mall Galleries, London, which was shortlisted for Artists & Illustrators “Artist of the Year”. The Reader’s vote will be announced at the Private View 6th January. The exhibition continues until 17th January. You can still vote for me here by clicking on this link.

30th anniversary celebrations continue when I will exhibiting at Spennymoor Town Hall 7th- 28th February. Further events are planned for March and April (including the launch of the City Church Portraits at the CastleGate) before we set off to Umbria, Italy for a week. I will be teaching on our painting holiday at a beautifully restored church Chiesa del Carmine.

We still have a few places available if you are interested in coming along. Six of the guests from last year have already re-booked.

 

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Jesmond Dene Painting

Jesmond Dene in Winter

Jesmond Dene in Winter Painting

My 30th Anniversary Christmas Party starts on the weekend of 15th-16th November. It’s one of several events we’re organising over the following year to celebrate my 30 years as a full time artist.

The featured painting on my invitation is Jesmond Dene in Winter. The original watercolour has already been sold, however I’ve decided to publish the painting as a limited edition giclee print with only 30 prints in the edition.

I’ve also reproduced the Jesmond Dene Painting as a Christmas Card which is available online in packs of 5 and at my Studio & Gallery in Ponteland.

The Jesmond Dene Painting was inspired by an afternoons sledging with my grandchildren one winter in Jesmond Dene. I managed a small sketchbook watercolour before the light faded and took a number of photographs which I used to compose the painting. Already, I’ve had a number of customers contacting me saying that the painting reminds them of times they have spent sledging with their own children.

The exhibition which runs until 24th December includes a number of new paintings including scenes of Newcastle, Northumberland, Scotland, Italy and the Middle East.

As a special thank you to the customers who have supported Alan Reed Art over the last 30 years, there will a Christmas present for the party guests attending the weekend preview. There will also be a Christmas Bran Tub along with festive refreshments!

If you are unable to attend the Christmas Exhibition Party but would like to be informed of future events please subscribe to our newsletter which we usually send out once a month.

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Watercolour Tips

Favourite Artists

Watercolour Artists

I’m currently running a 6 week watercolour painting course at my Studio & Gallery in Ponteland. One of my top Watercolour Tips is to study the work of some of the great watercolourists.

There are a some terrific books available which are a “must buy” for anyone wishing to develop their watercolour skills.

Starting with Watercolour by Rowland Hilder is the first book on painting that I really took note of. Not only does it contain some great watercolour advice but also some good, simple examples of basic drawing principles like perspective, vanishing points and eye levels.

Another great book by Rowland Hilder is Painting Landscapes in Watercolour. It has a good number of paintings reproduced in stages from the start to completion. This is really helpful if you want to have a go at copying them. Copying paintings is a discipline which I totally endorse as part of the learning process.

One of the finest watercolorists is the American Winslow Homer. His watercolours are breathtakingly beautiful. A book by Helen A. Cooper on his watercolours will be a constant inspiration to anyone who loves this medium.

In June I saw a couple of brilliant exhibitions of Edward Seago paintings in London. One of the exhibitions at the Portland Gallery was to coincide with a new book on Edward Seago by James Russell. It’s certainly worth getting if you like his work. Another book to add to your Christmas list (which contains some larger plates of Seago watercolours) is Edward Seago by Ron Ranson.

For more Watercolour Tips you need look no further than John Singer Sargent. The recent book John Singer Sargent Watercolours which was launched in conjunction with a major exhibition of his watercolours in New York and Boston in 2013 is another inspirational book.

There are many other books on the market which I could recommend. These however, are amongst my favourites.

Some of the links on this post is are affiliate links to books which I personally read, available from Amazon. If you click on any of the links and buy the product then I will receive a small percentage of the sale from Amazon at no extra cost to yourself. 

 

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Bill Quay

Watercolour Painting of River Tyne

Original Watercolour of Bill Quay

Several months ago I received an enquiry about taking on a commission to do a watercolour painting of Bill Quay. The painting was to be a “thank you” present from a lady to give to her parents as she was getting married in the summer.

Bill Quay on the River Tyne holds special personal memories for the family. We discussed a specific size that would fit with her budget and I went one evening to Bill Quay to do a small sketchbook watercolour of the scene that the client had in mind.

Over the years I’ve painted many views of the River Tyne including North Shields, Fishing. I had a good idea of what would work for this particular painting.

The client approved the sketch so I was able to commence on the finished 14″ x 10″ watercolour, painted on an Arches Watercolour Block. Once again, the painting received the “thumbs up” from the client so all that needed to be done was to organise the framing and delivery.

We offer a bespoke framing service at my Studio & Gallery in Ponteland where we have a comprehensive range of framing and mount options and I have over 30 years experience in helping customers choose the right frame and mount for a painting. I thought it would be nice to feature the client’s response to the commission.

“Just to let you know I have given the painting of Bill Quay to my parents today. It was also the first time I have seen it. Needless to say there were lots of tears! They were so pleased they have made sure everyone has seen it who is here today at the family barbecue.  I can’t thank you enough, its absolutley brilliant and the mounting and frame is just fantastic. They have said they will put a review on the website and of course I will as well. Thank you again, its just everything and more.” L.

One of the links on this post is an affiliate link to an Arches Watercolour Block, a product which I personally use, available from Amazon. If you click on the link and buy this product then I will receive a small percentage of the sale from Amazon at no extra cost to yourself.

 

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Hareshaw Linn

Hareshaw Linn, Bellingham

Hareshaw Linn Waterfall

Hareshaw Linn, Bellingham

Sketchbook Study of Hareshaw Linn

Hareshaw Linn painting

14″ x 10″ watercolour of Hareshaw Linn

In April I was asked to do a watercolour demonstration for a painting/writing club who were having a weekend away together in Bellingham. On the Saturday I went out with the group to paint various scenes of the local area. I’d read about Hareshaw Linn in the hotel guide book so I decided to make it my first port of call.

I decided to do several watercolour studies of the waterfall at Hareshaw Linn which is about 2 miles walk outside of Bellingham. The walk is lovely and the waterfall quite spectacular, especially after the heavy rain we’d had the night before. In total I did two sketchbook studies and two watercolours on Arches blocks.

You can see in the first photograph my improvised studio (a moss covered rock) which gave me a standing position to paint from. The second photograph is my sketchbook. The third is my larger watercolour painted on the Arches Block. By the time I’d finished there was no time to start on anything else!

All the paintings were made without any preliminary pencil work which enabled me to paint very directly onto the paper with a size 20 brush. The paintings can be seen at my Studio & Gallery in Ponteland.

Since this weekend  away I’ve painted a larger watercolour of Hareshaw Linn using the studies made on location. I’ve kept the palette the same and tried to avoid getting into complicated detail, maintaining the freshness of the “en plein air” watercolours.

 

 

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Spring Exhibition

Ponte Vecchio Painting of Italy

Ponte Vecchio, Firenze

Florence is possibly my favourite Italian city. I’ve been fortunate to travel there several time since my first visit back in 1998 when I sat on one of its bridges under the warm autumnal sun and painted a watercolour of Ponte Vecchio in an Arches Watercolour Block.

During my last visit there in 2011 I did a small sketchbook study of Ponte Vecchio from Piazza Michelangelo, a view which I’ve also reproduced as a very popular limited edition print.

This new original watercolour takes elements from the sketchbook study which I painted on location to depict the famous bridge stretching over the River Arno and the surrounding buildings.

I’ve also made this painting available as a small limited edition print.

Both the print and the original can be seen at my Spring Exhibition at the Studio & Gallery, Ponteland.

Some of the links on this post are affiliate links to products which I personally use available from Amazon. If you click on the links and buy any of these products then I will receive a small percentage of the sale from Amazon at no extra cost to yourself.

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Grey Street, Spring

Grey Street, Newcastle upon Tyne Spring

Grey Street, Spring

It’s 22 years since I first painted this amazing view of Newcastle’s Grey Street. Over the years I’ve captured it in all the seasons.

One of the versions was painted on a Saturday morning and in 2011 was featured on BBC’s “Show me the Monet”.

I’ve just completed this new original watercolour of “Grey Street, Spring” which is going to be on show at my “Spring” exhibition at my Studio & Gallery in Ponteland starting Saturday 8th March.

Grey Street, Spring is also available as a limited edition print.

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Painting of the Roman Baths

Watercolour Painting Roman Baths, Reflections

Roman Baths, Reflections

Bath is a stunningly beautiful city which boasts some of the finest Georgian architecture in the country. In 2010 and 2011 I entered the Bath Prize with a number of original watercolours of Bath. I came runner up in 2010 with my painting of the Royal Crescent and won the Circus Prize in 2011. Also in 2011 my painting Pump Room in the Snow was Highly Commended. One of my favourite subject though which I have painted several times on location was the Roman Baths. This particular scene depicts these ancient waters bathed in the early evening torchlight with the architecture reflected in the pool that dates back almost 2000 years. The original watercolour can be seen at my Studio & Gallery in Ponteland.

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