Tag Archives: studio and gallery

Grey Street, Snow Shower

Grey Street, Snow Shower

Grey Street, Snow Shower

In the spring of 2008 I launched a limited edition print titled “Theatre Royal in the Snow”. The print was an instant success and the edition of 95 sold out. The smaller preparation study that I made prior to the larger studio painting was used as the Christmas card for the Theatre Royal that year. The popularity of the scene was down to a number of different factors, two of which were the monochromatic colours and the little girl with the red coat who is my eldest granddaughter Emily. She provides that tiny splash of colour and is an obvious focal point.

Over the last few weeks, I’ve had a number of folk call in to my studio and gallery in Ponteland asking if the original print is still available to purchase. It’s not, however, so as not to disappoint, I’ve decided to paint a landscape version of the same view, but to include more of Grey Street. The new print will be available in different sizes and will be on my website very soon. Here’s a preview of the painting on my drawing board.

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Melville Street, Edinburgh

Melville Street, Edinburgh

Melville Street, Edinburgh

This limited edition print of Melville street, Edinburgh is dominated by the distinctive outline of St Mary’s Episcopal Cathedral. Its central spire of 270 feet punctuates the skyline of this street scene of Edinburgh’s New Town.

The figures, each one preoccupied with their own tasks, are an integral part of this watercolour. One can see different aspects of city life being played out through these people. The young woman in the foreground is fumbling about in her bag for something, the office worker is barely breaking his stride to post something in a hurry and an older man is clearly feeling the strain of heavy shopping bags in contrast to the pace of the other gentleman who has overtaken him. His only burden is his jacket thrown casually over his shoulder. Further down the street, another man is resting against a lamppost whilst waiting for somebody.

These paintings of Edinburgh remind me of the study notes of Proverbs Chapter 1 verses 20-21 in the NIV version of the Bible where wisdom speaks out through the centre of life in the city, where man’s communal experience of the creation order is concentrated. One can also read in chapter 8 of Proverbs how wisdom personified was with God at the beginning of creation.

You can see further examples of life in Edinburgh by visiting my studio and gallery in Ponteland or the section on Scotland on my website.

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Bamburgh Castle, Winter’s Walk

Bamburgh Castle, Winter's Walk

Bamburgh Castle, Winter's Walk

A number of years ago I was commissioned by a major North East company to paint over a dozen large watercolours of Northumbrian Castles for their board rooms. One of the first ones I tackled was Bamburgh Castle which boasts commanding views over the surrounding landscape. The castle itself is steeped in history and was often the target for marauding Scots. Over the centuries it deteriorated, however it was restored by its various owners during the 18th and 19th centuries. It was finally bought by the Victorian industrialist William Armstrong, who completed the restoration. Today the castle still belongs to the Armstrong family and is opened to the public. It also hosts weddings and corporate events. It has also been used as a location for films since the 1920s, such as Ivanhoe (1952), El Cid (1961), Mary, Queen of Scots (1972), and Elizabeth (1998).

This particular painting began as a 12″ x 9″ watercolour painted on location one late winter morning as the sun began to rise over the sea. It was a magnificent scene that was a joy to paint. As I worked I couldn’t help thinking why the whole world was not here to enjoy the beauty of what I was experiencing. I was alone, apart from the odd person walking their dog. The print, (seen above in a deep edged mount) is taken from an original watercolour painted in the studio and can be purchased either online or from my studio and gallery in Ponteland.

If you have one of my prints of Bamburgh Castle which evokes special memories which you would like to share, then please feel free to post a comment below.

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Frank Henry Mason

Frank Henry Mason Seascape

Frank Henry Mason Seascape, Scarborough

One of my clients is a great fan and collector of paintings by Frank Henry Mason (1876-1965). Over the last few years he’s asked me to put new mounts on the pieces he’s purchased and I have to say they totally transform the look of Mr Mason’s paintings. His breathtaking watercolours of maritime scenes, gouache landscapes for railway posters and oil paintings take on a fresh, clean, crisp appearance when taken out of their, often, tatty, dirty, frames with dowdy mounts and placed into new deep edged mounts made with conservation acid free board.

The scene above is typical of Frank’s work. He received no formal training in art but having left HMS Conway, he settled in Scarborough about 1894 where he then studied at the Scarborough School of Art. He later became a founder member of the Staithes Art Club.

His time at sea can be seen in his deep understanding of waves, skies and the way ships sit in the water. If you get the chance to check out the poster artwork he did for Great Northern Railway, Great Western Railway, London, Midland and Scottish Railway, London and North Eastern Railway, North Eastern Railway, British Rail, Underground Group Railway Companies and Ocean Liner Companies, you will see an artist who was sensitive to his subject matter yet retaining a direct, no nonsense handling of bold colours and use of counterchange.

It’s great to get the chance to see his original paintings. Both myself and my father Kenneth Reed have a deep appreciation and respect for the paintings of Frank Henry Mason.

If you have any artwork which would benefit from receiving a new mount and frame, please feel free to call in to my studio and gallery in Ponteland for a no obligation quote.


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Kenneth Reed

Old Eldon Square by Kenneth Reed

Old Eldon Square by Kenneth Reed

The two artists which influenced me the most as a child were my grandfather Thomas Reed and my dad Kenneth Reed. My grandfather died when I was only four years old but I still vividly remember the paintings which hung my grandparents home, and indeed the painting he did before he died which has effected my life for eternity. I will write about that some other time.

My dad has been a constant influence throughout my life. He trained as a graphic designer but would often be working on paintings in watercolour at home, usually on the dining room table. For the last thirty years he has become recognised as the leading golf artist in the world, capable of painting in a number of different mediums, including watercolour, oils and an Art Deco poster style.

One of the first paintings he did in the flat colour Art Deco technique was this one of Old Eldon Square in Newcastle upon Tyne, depicted in 1928. Two of the three sides of Old Eldon Square were pulled down to make way for the shopping centre that was built in the 1970’s but one of the Georgian sides still remains today. This painting is still available as a limited edition print from my website alanreed.com or my studio and gallery in Ponteland.

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